Intern Impressions of Enoosaen: Part 2

 

Rachel Bergen and George Radner are undergraduate students at the University of British Columbia.

They spent this past summer interning with Kakenya’s Dream on the ground in Enoosaen. Here, they blog a conversation about their experiences in the final part of their series, Intern Impressions.

Rachel and George Blog Pt 2.png

Rachel:
One thing that really stood out to me during our internship was the holistic nature of education at the Kakenya Center for Excellence (KCE) primary boarding school.

George:
Yeah, I had heard about it on the website, but the value of all of KCE’s programming only truly sunk in when I saw everything in action. Rachel, which aspects of KCE’s educational model were you most impressed by?

Rachel:
Well, the extracurricular opportunities at KCE are extraordinary!  The sports, the mentorship, the health and leadership camps, and of course, the field trips!

George:
I totally agree about the field trips. Enoosaen is a pretty tiny place, and it’s Kakenya’s dream to encourage and inspire the girls at KCE to become local, national, and even global leaders. A major part of that is exposing them to the world outside the village, an experience they may not get otherwise.

Rachel:
Each class goes on at least one field trip per year. The trips are enriching, educational, and fun, too! The girls get to know each other and socialize in a new environment, and build deeper relationships. After five years at KCE, they will have seen so much of what Kenya has to offer.

George:
The educational components of the field trips are aligned with the students’ classroom learning. They start with short field trips locally, and progress to visit sites all over the country.

Rachel:
They visit airports, manufacturing sites, national parks, the county government, and even the national government in the capital, Nairobi.

George:
We were so lucky to be able to join two of the field trips this summer!

Rachel:
Definitely! I loved going on safari at Maasai Mara National Park with the 4th graders, and visiting the beautiful city of Nakuru with the 7th graders.

George:
On the trip to Nakuru, the girls learned about geological formations, volcanic activity, and archeology, all while being immersed in an idyllic natural setting.

Rachel:
After living in Enoosaen for three months, I realized that the exposure they get on these trips has an even deeper value.

George:
I know what you mean! They learn valuable skills like how to identify wild animals, sleep on a moving bus, and cross busy roads in a busy city.

Rachel:
George, that’s not at all what I am talking about.

George:
Do tell!

Rachel:
The field trips bring them out of their comfort zones a bit. The new places they visit take them out of the familiar and expose the girls to how other people live, different career possibilities, life in a big city, and many other opportunities at their fingertips!

George:
I see what you mean. For someone who has lived in a remote village their whole life, it may not always be easy to imagine something different.

Rachel:
Exactly! The girls also get to see women taking on a variety of careers which they can aspire to. It’s opportunities like these that help ignite girls’ passions for what they want to be when they grow up, and they begin to formulate new dreams to aspire to as they get older!

George:
I can only imagine what phenomenal trips Kakenya’s Dream has planned for the new high school students, as well.

Rachel:
Now that’s for sure! Overall, I think it’s crucial the girls get to go on these field trips, and I’m so glad we had the opportunity to experience a few during our time here.

George:
I couldn’t agree more! This internship experience has been the opportunity of a lifetime all around, and it’s been an honor to share the experience with you!

Rachel:
The feeling is mutual. It has been lovely chatting with you, but it’s now time for me to say my farewells to everyone here in Enoosaen and board my flight back to Canada!

George:
Always a pleasure, Rachel. I’ll catch you back in Canada!




 
Andrew Isaacs